Posts Categorized: Bulletin

Postdoc and staff scientist positions at Harvard Medical School

My lab at Harvard Medical School has a unique “dry lab/wet lab” emphasis, with a focus on developing novel machine learning methodology coupled with experimental techniques applied to solving relevant biomedical problems. Positions in my lab can be good opportunities for trainees to develop new skills in the deep learning field and/or applications to microbiology.

I currently have several postdoc openings and a staff scientist position, described on my website: https://can01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgerber.bwh.harvard.edu%2F&data=05%7C01%7Cgrad.bme%40utoronto.ca%7C16dfdd251cad4fe5623908dad321617b%7C78aac2262f034b4d9037b46d56c55210%7C0%7C0%7C638054440581183229%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=1Sb7SmHzUHz%2Fv1KZ%2FRoS5dnvjTggr3Yzl2Mz%2BTGj7lc%3D&reserved=0

Thank you for your time!

Regards,
Georg K. Gerber, MD, PhD, MPH
Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School
Member of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology Faculty
Chief, Division of Computational Pathology
Co-Director, Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center
Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
60 Fenwood Road, 8002M
Boston, MA 02115
email: ggerber@bwh.harvard.edu
tel: (617) 278-0468   fax: (617) 264-6898
Gerber lab: https://can01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgerber.bwh.harvard.edu%2F&data=05%7C01%7Cgrad.bme%40utoronto.ca%7C16dfdd251cad4fe5623908dad321617b%7C78aac2262f034b4d9037b46d56c55210%7C0%7C0%7C638054440581183229%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=1Sb7SmHzUHz%2Fv1KZ%2FRoS5dnvjTggr3Yzl2Mz%2BTGj7lc%3D&reserved=0
computational pathology: https://can01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcomp-path.bwh.harvard.edu%2F&data=05%7C01%7Cgrad.bme%40utoronto.ca%7C16dfdd251cad4fe5623908dad321617b%7C78aac2262f034b4d9037b46d56c55210%7C0%7C0%7C638054440581183229%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=ETAmEIIllMryEfsFN6%2FXVyuz0huNoeybIMlwanGSvLk%3D&reserved=0
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DEC 6: How to Launch Your Startup in 2023

Commercialize your research, form a startup!

UofT’s Hatchery LaunchLab program is specifically structured to support Grad students and PIs with the platform and resources to conceive, develop, and form a startup company. We provide support and funding to enable follow-on investment for engineering research-based startups.

Join our LaunchLab webinar on Tuesday, December 6, at noon. We will discuss the framework, offerings, admission criteria, and highlight graduate student startup success stories!

Tuesday, December 6, 2022
12:00-12:45pm ET
Virtual event
We look forward to supporting your startup goals. 
The Entrepreneurship Hatchery
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
University of Toronto


Upcoming in Gradlife

 Grad Workshop: Talking to New People Online for Grad Students (Zoom)

Wednesday, November 30, 6-7:30pm

 

Do you find talking to new people difficult? Do your fears hold you back from making connections? Are you finding it hard to build meaningful connections? Talking and connecting with new people is a challenge that everyone faces (even for Graduate students) and we created this workshop to help you develop the skills you need to not only make new connections, but to manage the fear and anxiety that comes along with it. In this workshop, we will teach you how to make new connections during your graduate programs and you will practice these skills so that you’ll leave with experience, and confidence that will help you continue talking to new people.  Facilitated by Jennifer Pinker, Student Life Coordinator, Graduate Programs and the Gradlife Ambassador. https://clnx.utoronto.ca/home/gradlife.htm?eventId=49010

 

Grad Escape: Paper Snowflakes Social (Grad Room, Refreshments provided)

Tuesday, December 6, 12-1:30pm

 

Whether you love winter, or just want a study break, our Snowflake Social is the event for you! Join your fellow Grad students in trying out some crazy snowflake designs that are sure to impress and look great on your window or wall! For the event, all you need are paper and scissors, and our Gradlife Ambassador will run a fun workshop on different snowflake designs you can try out. As well, you will have plenty of time to hang out with your fellow Grad students and show off your art. https://clnx.utoronto.ca/home/gradlife.htm?eventId=45074

 

Holiday Card Making Social (Grad Room, Refreshments provided)

Thursday, December 8, 5-6pm

Join your peers and make some festive holiday cards. No artistic experience needed!  Paper will be provided.

https://clnx.utoronto.ca/home/gradlife.htm?eventId=45075

 

 

Grad Escape Virtual Games Night

December 12, 7-8:30pm

Are you looking to have fun and meet other grad students? Look no further than Games Night! Join the Gradlife Ambassador as they facilitate a series of fun, low-stakes online games for you and your fellow grad students to enjoy. Facilitated by the Gradlife Ambassador. https://clnx.utoronto.ca/home/gradlife.htm?eventId=45168

 

 

 

Jennifer Pinker

Student Life Coordinator, Graduate Programs and Outreach

Orientation, Transition and Engagement

Division of Student Life

University of Toronto

21 Sussex Avenue, Room 318

Phone: 416-946-0148

Jennifer.pinker@utoronto.ca

 

This email is green. Please consider the environment before printing this email.

 


Solidarity with Iran and the Elimination of Violence against Women

Solidarity with Iran and the Elimination of Violence against Women

 

Today, we join with the global community in recognizing the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25th, which begins 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence culminating in World Human Rights Day on December 10th.

 

Recent events underscore the importance of these commemorations — in particular, the appalling murders of Mahsa Amini and over 300 protestors in Iran, many of them young women. The uprisings for women’s freedoms are nearing the third month, and highlight the ongoing advocacy of Iranian feminist and solidarity movements that have existed for decades. The suppression of fundamental human rights and ongoing discrimination against women have led to horrific injuries, both physical and mental, and innumerable deaths.

 

This crisis in Iran illustrates the political dimensions of public health and health care, which we must always remember.

 

We also note that gender-based violence and women’s rights are an issue in our own homes and institutions. In Canada, indicators of intimate partner violence and gender-based violence increased drastically in the spring of 2020, underscoring the shadow pandemic of violence alongside COVID-19. Compared to cisgendered people, trans and gender-diverse people are significantly more likely to experience physical or sexual assault.

 

Within these 16 Days of Activism, on December 6th U of T will join Canadians in remembering 14 young women who were killed at Polytechnique Montréal in 1989.

 

Stereotypes, misinformation and (micro)aggressions that undermine women’s rights to exist and succeed are still present in our historically male-dominated spaces. Each time we hear them, we must speak up to counter comments that question the need for gender representation, judge the demographics of specific specialities or research areas, or deny gendered power hierarchies. These comments and resulting behaviours can entrench anti-feminist attitudes, thoughts, and resentments which in some cases, lead to acts of violence.

 

It may seem that recognizing the excellence of women in our community has come a long way from the sexist histories of our institutions. However, let’s not forget the ongoing threats to women and gender-diverse people in our institutions and across the globe, and the need to eliminate them. Acting in allyship and solidarity is key for each of us, both as individuals and as members of educational and healthcare institutions.

 

Please find below some resources for support for those who have been impacted by ongoing events in Iran, and further education on gender-based violence:

 

U of T Resources

 

Community Resources

 


Distribution request Fri Nov 25: Solidarity with Iran and the Elimination of Violence against Women

 

Good evening,

­­

Temerty Medicine and Dalla Lana have shared a joint statement in solidarity with Iran, and in recognition of International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (Friday November 25). Kindly pass on the following message to your department listservs tomorrow, Friday November 25 or as soon as is feasible, and include in any newsletters/website/social channels. Attached is a Word doc version for web posting.

 

The most updated version of this message will be live here tomorrow morning: https://temertymedicine.utoronto.ca/solidarity-iran-and-elimination-violence-against-women. Thank you!

 

P.S. Next Saturday December 3 is International Day of Persons with Disabilities – next week we will be sharing a message for distribution on Friday December 2.

 

~~~

Solidarity with Iran and the Elimination of Violence against Women

 

Today, we join with the global community in recognizing the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25th, which begins 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence culminating in World Human Rights Day on December 10th.

 

Recent events underscore the importance of these commemorations — in particular, the appalling murders of Mahsa Amini and over 300 protestors in Iran, many of them young women. The uprisings for women’s freedoms are nearing the third month, and highlight the ongoing advocacy of Iranian feminist and solidarity movements that have existed for decades. The suppression of fundamental human rights and ongoing discrimination against women have led to horrific injuries, both physical and mental, and innumerable deaths.

 

This crisis in Iran illustrates the political dimensions of public health and health care, which we must always remember.

We also note that gender-based violence and women’s rights are an issue in our own homes and institutions. In Canada, indicators of intimate partner violence and gender-based violence increased drastically in the spring of 2020, underscoring the shadow pandemic of violence alongside COVID-19. Compared to cisgendered people, trans and gender-diverse people are significantly more likely to experience physical or sexual assault.

 

Within these 16 Days of Activism, on December 6th U of T will join Canadians in remembering 14 young women who were killed at Polytechnique Montréal in 1989.

 

Stereotypes, misinformation and (micro)aggressions that undermine women’s rights to exist and succeed are still present in our historically male-dominated spaces. Each time we hear them, we must speak up to counter comments that question the need for gender representation, judge the demographics of specific specialities or research areas, or deny gendered power hierarchies. These comments and resulting behaviours can entrench anti-feminist attitudes, thoughts, and resentments which in some cases, lead to acts of violence.

 

It may seem that recognizing the excellence of women in our community has come a long way from the sexist histories of our institutions. However, let’s not forget the ongoing threats to women and gender-diverse people in our institutions and across the globe, and the need to eliminate them. Acting in allyship and solidarity is key for each of us, both as individuals and as members of educational and healthcare institutions.

 

Please find below some resources for support for those who have been impacted by ongoing events in Iran, and further education on gender-based violence:

 

U of T Resources

 

Community Resources

 

 

Lisa Richardson
Associate Dean, Inclusion & Diversity
Temerty Faculty of Medicine

 

Adalsteinn (Steini) Brown
Dean, Dalla Lana School of Public Health


1 Week Left to Apply to L2M NSERC

 
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Applications for the Lab2Market NSERC Fall 2022 Cohort close in 1 week!

This program is delivered in partnership with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and is an extension of the Idea to Innovation (I2I) Market Assessment Grant.

This 4-month program offers:

  • Curriculum (lectures, talks, and workshops) designed to introduce researchers to the world of entrepreneurship.

  • An advisor network (founders, industry leaders, and service providers) to help researchers through their business venture. 

  • community of like-minded entrepreneurs.

  • $15,000 in funding to support researchers in getting their idea off the ground.

  • The opportunity for future funding through the NSERC I2I Phase I grant. 

Applications close on December 2nd, 2022. You can find additional details on the program in our information package (here).

We encourage you to come out to our final information session to learn more about this opportunity (Register here). 

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out to our Learning & Recruitment Specialist, Wesley Kosiba, wkosiba@ryerson.ca.

Learn more about & apply to L2M NSERC
Join us for an information session
Lab2Market is made possible with the funding support of FedDev, ACOA, Prairies Economic Development Canada, Canada’s Ocean’s Supercluster, and Mitacs, and with the support of I-INC, Springboard, V1, University of Manitoba, Dalhousie University, Memorial University, and Toronto Metropolitan University.
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Student Opportunity: Hack The Hospital 2

 

University of Toronto students and alumni are invited to participate in Hack the Hospital 2, a hackathon designed to improve the lives of pediatric patients. Participants will work in multidisciplinary and international teams

to ideate and prototype the hospital room of the future. The two winning ideas will present their idea live at the Mobile World Capital stand at the Mobile World Congress 2023 in Barcelona.

 

This year’s edition is led by the leading pediatric hospitals of Sant Joan de Déu (Barcelona), the Great Ormond Street (London) and the SickKids (Toronto) and includes the participation and mentorship of real patients
and healthcare professionals from each hospital.

 

Students and alumni working in technology, business, healthcare, architecture, communications, and creative arts are encouraged to apply.

 

The hackathon takes place February 18-19, 2023.

Apply here  

 

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Upcoming LinkedIn Workshop

The MBPCDA is excited to host an upcoming workshop on crafting your LinkedIn profile, presented by Dr. Nana Lee. The interactive workshop will be held on December 8 at 5:30 PM.
Dr. Nana Lee’s biography
     Dr. Nana Lee holds a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Toronto, a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan and was a Visiting Scholar at Whitehead (Broad) Institute for Biomedical Research, MIT with the world’s leading group of the International Human Genome Project. Her roles in the biotechnology industry include Senior Research Scientist for Ellipsis Biotherapeutics and Senior Research Scientist, Product Manager and Director of Application Science for DNA Software Inc.
     She currently holds the position of Director and Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream of Graduate Professional Development (GPD) for both Departments of Biochemistry and Immunology, Director of Mentorship and GPD for Research and Graduate Education (formerly GLSE), Temerty Faculty of Medicine, and the Lead for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committees. Her most recent initiative is spearheading the GLSE PhD Leaders Program. She has presented to over 2500 audience members from high school, undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and professionals throughout the USA, Canada, and Asia.
Questions? Email us at mbpcda@gmail.com


Seminar Talk: Artificial Intelligence in Health: Research and Applications in Toronto

Dear students

 

See below for November MScAC Talk:

 

Title: “Artificial Intelligence in Health: Research and Applications in Toronto”

Speaker: Dr. Muhammad Mamdani

 

Date: Monday, November 28th

Time: 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. (Eastern Time)

Location: Zoom

 

Register here: https://t.co/moCiW2axy7

 

Abstract: While the application of artificial intelligence (AI) has transformed numerous sectors including retail, transportation, and hospitality, its application to health has been limited. The Toronto community is well-positioned to advance AI research and application given its strengths in relevant disciplines such as medicine, allied health, computer science, mathematics, engineering, and statistics. This talk will provide an overview of the newly established Temerty Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Education in Medicine (T-CAIREM) of the University of Toronto and present examples of applied AI research and translation. A particular focus on AI translation will provide attendees with a deeper appreciation of the complexity of AI applications in health.

 

Speaker Bio:  Dr. Mamdani is Vice President of Data Science and Advanced Analytics at Unity Health Toronto and Director of the University of Toronto Temerty Faculty of Medicine Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Education in Medicine (T-CAIREM). Dr. Mamdani’s team bridges advanced analytics including machine learning with clinical and management decision-making to improve patient outcomes and hospital efficiency. Dr. Mamdani is also a Professor in the Department of Medicine of the Temerty Faculty of Medicine, the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, and the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation of the Dalla Lana Faculty of Public Health. He is also an adjunct Senior Scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and a Faculty Affiliate of the Vector Institute. In 2010, Dr. Mamdani was named among Canada’s Top 40 under 40. He has published over 500 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals.

 

Watch past MScAC talks: https://mscac.utoronto.ca/all-mscac-talks

 

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Office of the Vice Dean Graduate Studies 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering | University of Toronto
44 St. George Street | Toronto | Ontario | M5S 2E4

www.engineering.utoronto.ca | gradstudies@engineering.utoronto.ca

 


Battle for Freedom: Laura Targownik on Transgender Day of Remembrance

 

Battle for Freedom: Laura Targownik on Transgender Day of Remembrance

As events for this year’s Transgender Awareness Week come to a close, we turn our attention towards Transgender Day of Remembrance, which is internationally recognized on Sunday, November 20. The day was first observed to honour the life of Rita Hester, a Black trans woman who was killed in 1998. More than twenty years later, this time is a chance for all to honour the contributions of trans and non-binary people who have suffered violence in fighting for rights or simply for existing.

Laura Targownik (she/her) is an associate professor and the department of medicine division director of gastroenterology and hepatology at the Temerty Faculty of Medicine, as well as a clinician-scientist at Sinai Health. She recently spoke with writer Jerusha Retnakanthan about trans justice.

~

How do you connect with Transgender Day of Remembrance?

I can only speak from my own experiences as one member of the transgender community, and as someone who is not a gender scholar or an activist. And, as a white non-queer-presenting woman, I have not faced the same challenges as many trans people from historically disadvantaged communities, or those who face the regular disenfranchisement that comes with a lack of access to power.

I understand the primary focus of this day is on those who have died, often violently, as a result of bigotry toward trans and gender non-conforming people. Unlike other days of remembrance for past wars or tragedies, this day is an acknowledgment that the battle for freedom from anti-trans violence is ongoing. 

This is a day to honour the countless trans individuals who died, without ever having been able to live in the world as their true selves. Many people die by suicide or suffer deaths of despair, unwilling or justifiably fearful to face the daily depredations of moving through the world as a visible trans person. While the world is somewhat more welcoming to trans and other gender variant people, there are still significant barriers to transitioning. I consider myself to be quite fortunate that I live at a time in history, in a part of the world, where I had some latitude to explore my identity and take tangible steps towards moving through the world as a woman.

 

Can you share more about those supports and your experience back then?

I began my social transition in 2001 at the age of 28. I had been experiencing severe dysphoria since childhood, but being part of a tight cultural community in Winnipeg, I did not feel confident in expressing my gender or exploring my feelings. I was fortunate to be accepted into a fellowship at UCLA, and recognized that if I was going to figure out whether transitioning made sense for me, there was not going to be a better time or place. 

In the early 2000s, there was much less trans-visibility, and representations in the public space tended to be sensational or prurient. I had never met another trans person in real life. I was admittedly quite sheltered, having had the privilege of growing up under comfortable economic conditions in a close and loving family.

I finally worked up the courage to reach out to the UCLA Trans Support Group, and for the first time saw other academics who were in the process of transitioning or who had transitioned. I felt a sense of myself reflected back in their experiences, and saw transition as a realistic possibility. This group became my support network. They guided me through some professional setbacks and lost opportunities, gave me pointers on my evolving presentation, and gave me comfort through the separation of my marriage and coming out to my family. They were integral in giving me space to figure out who I was.  

I recognize that having these supports was a consequence of significant privilege. I had the economic wherewithal to access medical care, psychological support, and other resources to make changes to my physical presentation that was comforting to my cis colleagues and society. I also was lucky to have a supporting family, who despite their initial reservations, have been in my corner throughout. Thanks to this good fortune, I’ve been able to avoid many of the indignities and threats to personal safety that trans people who lack community supports and economic security often face.

 

A recent article on transgender health in medical education by some of your colleagues in Toronto outlines five recommendations for reducing inequities. Which resonate most with you?

Coming from a perspective of care delivery and subspeciality education, representation is of particular importance. We should be trying to create a health-care workforce that reflects the communities we serve. It doesn’t mean there has to be an exact proportional match, but we want to welcome powerful voices from historically disadvantaged communities into the community of health care providers. Given the barriers to inclusion faced by trans individuals, universities like U of T must be responsible for using their power to lower barriers to entry and to encourage their participation.

Thankfully, trans people have made significant progress in their fight for acceptance and inclusion in medicine in many parts of the world. When I transitioned, I didn’t know of any other trans health-care providers. In 2022, we have a trans physician who is the assistant secretary for health for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. There is now a vibrant online community of trans physicians and other health care providers, many of whom who specialize in the delivery of gender affirming care.

Having visible trans people in health care acts as a beacon to other gender-diverse individuals that health care is an inclusive field. It also helps to assure trans and gender diverse people that they will receive care that is respectful and affirming of their identities. We are seeing many more clinicians who are public allies, and educational institutions are taking an active role in integrating trans affirming content into curriculum.  It means a lot to transgender people when they see their cisgender friends and colleagues as being proud allies in support of trans inclusion and elevation; that trans and gender diverse people are part of our community, and they who deserve to be honoured, treasured, and protected.

 

How else can Temerty Medicine and community members support the health and inclusion of transgender and gender-diverse people?

I recognize that U of T models itself as a progressive institution, and they have initiatives that do exemplify this. I’m part of the Diversity Mentorship Program, and initiatives that elevate trans stories and affirm the contributions of gender-diverse individuals is a significant positive change. Especially compared to the lack of resources I had access to as a trainee in early 2000s, and the lack of awareness of my colleagues.

I am concerned that there will be some attrition of trans acceptance in medicine in the years to come. Politicians, especially in the U.S., have identified the demonization of trans people and support for trans people as a wedge issue. They have been passing legislation restricting access to trans-affirming care and potentially criminalizing its provision to children and adolescents. They have also been co-opting medical boards who set standards for providing trans-affirming care, and blocking funding for hospitals that provide this care.  Arguments are couched in medical language that can seem reasonable to health care professionals who are less familiar with the evidence supporting the provision of trans-affirming care to adolescents. Some university hospitals, like Baylor Medical Centre, have stopped providing trans-supportive care to adolescents when legally threatened, with little visible protest.

I am fearful of how Canadian academic institutions will maintain the progress achieved, should they be under challenge in the future. What should Temerty Medicine and the University of Toronto do to now to proactively prepare for these potential threats?  Our medical community is not immune from these forces, so the University needs to be strategic about demonstrating its allyship, not only now, but into an uncertain future.

 

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Follow the Office of Inclusion and Diversity:

Website: temertymedicine.utoronto.ca/office-inclusion-and-diversity

Twitter: @UofTMed_OID

Instagram: @UofTMed_OID

 

Acknowledgment of Traditional Land

We wish to acknowledge this land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land. As a settler on this land, I set my intention to act in allyship and solidarity with Indigenous peoples, and to challenge the historical and ongoing impacts of colonization.

 


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